The White Guard - Lyttelton Theatre, National

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Venue Information
Lyttelton Theatre, National

Lyttelton Theatre, National
South Bank

Seating Plan


(10mins) Follow signs for exits to the South Bank. This should lead you to an underground pedestrian passage called ‘Sutton Walk’ that emerges at the South Bank. Turn right and walk along the river Thames until you see the National Theat

The White Guard

Mikhail Bulgakov was an iconic writer who hailed from Kiev and penned many famous works of the twentieth century; some pushing the boundaries as famous Science Fiction tales and others looking at the world around him.

However, it was during the Civil War in Kiev that Bulgakov would gain inspiration for one of his greatest works. It was a period in history that will undoubtedly contain many stories, but 85 years ago the Soviet novelist decided to chronicle that struggle of a White Army Officer’s family during what were upsetting and turbulent times.

With “The White Guard”, Bulgakov presented a work that received widespread acclaim and stands alongside his other novels as amongst the best of the twentieth century. An infamous figure in Russia he become as well known for his effect upon Joseph Stalin as his celebrated works of fiction, with the dictator banning one of his pieces that focused on him. But the man came to admire the writer for what was then known as “The Day of the Turbins” , what we call “The White Guard” when it appears in 2010. However, Bulgakov was also legendary for his wide range of Science Fiction stories, ranging from “The Fatal Eggs”, “Heart of a Dog” and “The Master and Margarita”.

In “The White Guard”, Andrew Upton has created a new version of the Bulgakov classic, in which the household of the Turbin family is turned upside down during the Russian Civil War in Kiev. There are many members of the household, including the beautiful Lena, who watches in intense horror as her brothers prepare themselves to join the battle – fighting alongside the White Guard. The horror around them are unimaginable as their friends take to the streets and blend in with the chaos, death and destruction that tears its way through the landscape of Kiev. As the turbulence and the sound of music echo, the Turbins know that great change is on the horizon, with the world they have involved themselves in for many years begins to crumble around them, taking a part of them with it.

“The White Guard” is set to be a passionate reinterpretation of the classic work from Upton, bringing out the compelling narrative to its true potential. It makes it a highly anticipated production and it appears at the Lyttelton National Theatre from Tuesday 23rd March 2010 (previews from Monday 15th March 2010) until Monday 12th April 2010.

Show Information
Booking From: Monday, 15th March 2010
Booking Until: Wednesday, 7th July 2010
Matinees: 2.15pm
Evenings: 7.30pm
Show Status: production_closed
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