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The Lion King - Lyceum Theatre

The Lion King
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Venue Information
Lyceum Theatre

Lyceum Theatre
21 Wellington Street
London
London
WC2E 7RQ

Seating Plan

Directions

Directions
(5mins) Go right on Long Acre; turn right into Bow Street/Wellington Street and follow the road 200 metres. The theatre is on your right.

Review Summary
Average Rating: 4.7 out of 5 stars based on 106 review(s)

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Latest Review: "Amazing. Absolutely amazing...."

Age Restriction: Please note: Children under 3 years of age are not permitted to enter the Lyceum Theatre. The Lion King is recommended for ages 6 and up. All persons aged 16 or under must be accompanied by an adult and may not sit on their own within the auditorium. All persons entering the theatre, regardless of age, must have a ticket.

Important Info: Please note: Children under 3 years of age are not permitted to enter the Lyceum Theatre. The Lion King is recommended for ages 6 and up. All persons aged 16 or under must be accompanied by an adult and may not sit on their own within the auditorium. All persons entering the theatre, regardless of age, must have a ticket. Strobe lighting is used several times during the performance. There is a wall present between Stalls seats Z17-23 and ZA15-23.

Over the years it has been clear to see that Disney films make for fantastic stage musicals. After all, one only has to ask theatregoers that have witnessed hits like Aladdin, The Little Mermaid and Beauty And The Beast over the years to hear evidence of the colourful characters, toe-tapping musical numbers and wonderful performances. Disney shows have the ability to enchant audiences of all ages.

But perhaps one of the most successful film-turned-stage musical is The Lion King, which runs at the Lyceum Theatre in London’s West End, whilst also boasting successful productions on Broadway and other worldwide locations as well. Like the others it has some beloved characters and hummable tunes alongside a story that has captured imaginations.

That story is set on the plains of Africa, on the wide open savannah.  It opens at sunrise on the savannah and the birth of Simba; the newborn son of wise old lion king Mufasa and his lioness queen, Sarabi.  Simba is next in line to the throne but this angers Mufasa’s brother Scar who is both greedy and ambitious and he immediately takes a dislike to the young prince.  Scar then starts to think of a way of disposing of both Simba and Mufasa and seize the throne for himself.

Time has passed and Simba is now a young and rather cocky cub.  His father shows him their kingdom called the ‘Pridelands’ and states that he must not venture outside of this domain.  He also stresses that all animals live together in a harmonious balance called ‘the circle of life’ and this must not be disturbed.

Simba is reckless and impulsive and acts without thought for anyone else.  He puts his best friend, Nala in danger and is reprimanded by his father who is disappointed by Simba’s thoughtlessness.  Mufasa is concerned by Simba’s behaviour and confides in his trusty counsellor, Zazu who reminds the king of his own impetuous youth.

Meanwhile, the treacherous Scar lures Simba to the Gorge where he has planned a surprise.  As Simba enters the gorge, Scar instructs a group of hyenas to startle a herd of wildebeest.  These do so and Simba is nearly trampled to death but for the timely intervention of his father, Mufasa.  In doing so, he ends up clinging to the side of a cliff and appeals to his brother, Scar for help.  However, Scar digs his claws into Mufasa’s arms which sends him tumbling down the cliff and into the path of the wildebeest.  Mufasa is then trampled to death.
 
With Scar pinning the death on Simba and the young cub powerless to think otherwise, he is horrified and racked with guilt. Scar banishes him from the Prideland this kickstarts the next chapter of the story, as Simba grows up away from his homeland.

Back in the kingdom, Sarabi and the others believe that both Simba and Musafa are dead.  Scar assumes the throne and in his lust for power has begins a rule which upsets the balance of the ‘circle of life’.  Meanwhile, Simba’s exile begins with a meeting of Timon and Pumbaa, and they take him under their wings as he grows up.

Time has passed and Simba is now a young lion.  In the Pridelands, Scar’s rule has turned the kingdom from one of prosperity into one of desolation.  Scar has become even greedier for power and decides to attain immortality by having children.  He is attracted to Nala, Simba’s playmate who has now grown up and has become an attractive young lioness.  Scar tries to force himself on her but Nala escapes and flees into the jungle.

In the jungle, Simba is still irresponsible and in an act of reckless behaviour, places his friend Timon in danger.  He manages to rescue him but feels ashamed of his behaviour and realises that he still has some growing up to do.

Pumbaa appears who is being chased by a lioness who turns out to be none other than Simba’s childhood friend, Nala.  She informs Timon and Pumbaa of their friend’s royal parentage.  She and Simba also realise the depth of their attraction for one another.  She tries to persuade Simba to return to the Pridelands and take his rightful place on the throne but Simba is still haunted by the death of his father and refuses.

However, a vision of his father, Mufasa appears and he tells Simba about the importance of the ‘circle of life’ and his role in its continuing existence.  Simba realises that he has to grow up and face his responsibilities and so returns to the Pridelands where the story continues...

With this memorable story audiences are in for a great time in London’s West End, so make sure you are part of a future audiences by picking up theatre tickets and heading to Theatreland’s Lyceum Theatre.

Did you know?

• The song shadowland, in the second half of the production, is a new song not seen in the film. Despite this, many familiar elements from the 1994 movie are still present.
• The cast features some talented performers, including Shaun Escoffery as Mufasa, Gary Jordan as Zazu and Nick Afoa as Adult Simba (correct as of July 2018).
• Whilst Nick Afoa plays Adult Simba, his younger incarnation is shared by Theo Grant, Ikechukwudi Machie, Hugo Max Woodhouse and Kai Plumber-Walrond (correct as of July 2018).
• The original Disney animated movie was released during a period known as the Disney Renaissance, which saw a resurgence in popularity for the animated films released by the studio. Other hits included The Little Mermaid, Beauty And The Beast and Aladdin.
• During the course of the show audiences will hear songs like I Just Can’t Wait To Be King, Circle Of Life, Hakuna Matata, Can You Feel The Love Tonight and He Lives In You, amongst others.

Show Information
Booking From: Wednesday, 21st November 2018
Booking Until: Saturday, 1st June 2019
Running Time: 2 hours 30 minutes
Age Restriction: Please note: Children under 3 years of age are not permitted to enter the Lyceum Theatre. The Lion King is recommended for ages 6 and up. All persons aged 16 or under must be accompanied by an adult and may not sit on their own within the auditorium. All persons entering the theatre, regardless of age, must have a ticket.
Important Info: Please note: Children under 3 years of age are not permitted to enter the Lyceum Theatre. The Lion King is recommended for ages 6 and up. All persons aged 16 or under must be accompanied by an adult and may not sit on their own within the auditorium. All persons entering the theatre, regardless of age, must have a ticket. Strobe lighting is used several times during the performance. There is a wall present between Stalls seats Z17-23 and ZA15-23.
Show Schedule
Tue: 7.30pm
Wed: 2.30pm and 7.30pm
Thu: 7.30pm
Fri: 7.30pm
Sat: 2.30pm and 7.30pm
Sun: 2.30pm
Express Ticket Search
Sunday, 16 Dec, 2018 Lyceum Theatre, London The Lion King
Tuesday, 18 Dec, 2018 Lyceum Theatre, London The Lion King
Wednesday, 19 Dec, 2018 Lyceum Theatre, London The Lion King
Thursday, 20 Dec, 2018 Lyceum Theatre, London The Lion King
Friday, 21 Dec, 2018 Lyceum Theatre, London The Lion King
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